Guys, there’s been a scabies outbreak in the Toon so here’s everything you need to know

Get your HC2 certificates at the ready!


You may have heard about the current Scabies outbreak which is spreading its way around Newcastle. From sports teams to societies… no one is safe. The outbreak apparently started with the sports teams but then again, they do seem to get scapegoated for everything. So, here’s everything you need to know about Newcastle’s new little pets. 

This first caught my attention when my housemate sent a rather ominous message in our group chat, informing us that one of her teammates had caught the dreaded skin condition. Initially, I was filled with panic. 

Like me, you may have assumed Scabies was some sort of rare and deadly disease, long eradicated. This is in fact not the case. While by no means pleasant, the symptoms of Scabies according to the NHS actually consist of a raised rash or spots, accompanied by intense itching which gets worse at night. That said, it is highly contagious and – brace yourself – caused by mites that burrow under the skin and lay eggs.

This all sounds pretty alarming, but Scabies is easily treatable, so you can rest assured you will survive this ordeal – as traumatic as it may be. If you happen to discover a new and particularly concerning rash, you can get an over the counter cream from your local pharmacy. Although I have heard rumours about pharmacies around Newcastle selling out, as you can see our pal managed to get her fix in Jesmond, so I have complete faith you can too. Make sure to also wash anything you may have touched for a prolonged period, such as towels, clothing and bedsheets to reduce the risk of contamination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately for everyone else you live with, the NHS recommends they to undergo treatment too, even if they don’t have any symptoms. Suddenly the infamously messy housemate doesn’t seem so bad anymore, now that you’ve introduced mites as the new family pet.

Further information about scabies symptoms causes and treatment can be found on the NHS website.