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Newcastle Uni student recovers after being diagnosed with stage four cancer

Mollie Mulheron was hours away from death after collapsing in a supermarket


Newcastle University graduate, Mollie Mulheron, has gone into remission following her battle with Stage four Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

In March this year, Mollie, returned from working as a teacher in the Galapagos Islands and collapsed in a local supermarket upon her return to the UK.

After previously being just hours away from death, the 25-year-old since recovered, and was told in October that she was officially cancer free, The Northern Echo reports.

Mollie, originally from North Yorkshire, completed her PGCE teaching qualification at Newcastle University in 2022.

After receiving her qualification, she embarked on a life-changing opportunity to teach in the Ecuadorian Galapagos Islands.

Although she was enjoying her time there, Mollie’s health was in bad shape, she said: “I loved it there it was amazing, but I began experiencing symptoms such as painful breathing, trouble swallowing, an achy and itchy body, constant exhaustion and finally just before I returned to the UK a shocking rash all over my lower body.”

“I had no idea at the time that I was literally hours from dying, and when I returned to the UK I became increasingly unwell without any credible explanation.”

Mollie was found to be hours away from death with a huge life-threatening tumour engulfing her chest and heart.

Due to the large tumour which was quickly spreading, Mollie endured 130 days in hospital with seven surgeries, and 800 hours of chemotherapy and lost her hair in the process.

However, the doctors gave her a prognosis that if the treatment went well, she might survive, and she did.

When speaking about her initial diagnosis and how much cancer has impacted her life, Mollie said: “I’ve been devastated by cancer and almost don’t recognise myself both inside and out; the hair loss was a massive part of my identity and the trauma of coping with a life-threatening illness, the isolation, and the long road back to recovery has changed me forever.”

“But I never failed to recognise that I have been incredibly lucky, I’ve met some really positive people in the months I was hospitalised who were not given the same hope with their treatment as me.”

Following the treatment, Mollie returned to the hospital in October to be told she was given the all-clear and officially cancer-free.

Following her recovery, Mollie published a book about her experiences to help those struggling with their diagnosis or loved ones. The book is called “Live, Laugh, Lymphoma – a young persons guide to giving cancer the middle finger”.