string(10) "manchester"

The Parklife 2024 line-up has been announced – but we’re not sure it’s worth the hype

Acts such as Disclosure, Nia Archives and Doja Cat are all playing at Heaton Park this summer


Parklife, presented by Manchester’s own Warehouse Project, have announced the line-up for the 2024 iteration of the festival.

The two day festival, which takes place on the 8th and 9th June, is always hotly anticipated by students across the city, with the timing making it a perfect post-exam season party.

This years line-up is once again stacked with some of the countries most popular DJs; Disclosure – who had already been teased as to be playing, are joined by Nia Archives, Peggy Gou and Fourtet as well as a joint enterprise by Fisher and Chris Lake.

The list of popular DJ’s on that line-up is endless, though. Ranging across varying styles of dance music, there’s DNB for the 16-year-olds in the crowd, ranging all the way to Ibiza regulars like Pawsa and new fan favourites like Barry can’t swim.

Most notably on the line-up, Doja Cat will be closing the Valley on Sunday 9th June. It is also the Americans first ever UK festival headline slot, which is sure to sell a few more tickets. Doja Cat’s inclusion on the line-up continues a recurring Parklife trend – having big DJ’s on all day, and close on the Sunday with a huge, non-dance pull. If we look to last year: The 1975 (unfortunately) closed on the Sunday, the year before included Tyler, The Creator and 2021’s line-up had Dave as a festival-exclusive headliner.

The line-up has divided opinion from fans online. Under the Instagram post announcing the line-up, we saw contrasting comments such as “shittest line-up ever” to “we have to go” and “this is a pretty sick line up.” Parklife also ran a competition under the post whereby tagging people enters you into a draw to win tickets, which made searching for actual comments with people’s opinions on the line-ip nearly impossible. Thanks for that.

This years festival tickets start from £79.50 + booking fee for a single day, and £129.50 + booking fee for the whole weekend. Whilst this may seem expensive, a WHP ticket can easily be over £30, and you might only get one or two of the acts on this line-up playing there. Is it just about worth it?

Then again, you do have to spend your entire day travelling cross-city to be inundated with dri-fit and smartwhips, followed by the soul-destroying, endless trek back to Fallow.