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The three best study spots at Strathclyde Uni if working at home isn’t cutting it anymore

Plus you pesky Glasgow Uni students can get in too if you want to come over to the dark side


Need to cram in some last minute essay writing, or are you just wanting a comfy place to relax and hang out? Here’s a guide to Strathclyde’s top study spots, with some locations also being accessible to Glasgow Uni and GCU students.

1. Andersonian Library

Entrance to the library (and delicious food awaiting you)

If you’re studying at Strathclyde, you’ve likely entered the Andersonian Library at some point. Whether that’s for one of the uni-led tours, to take out some much needed study assistance in the form of course literature, or even just to snatch up a hot drink and sandwich at the Starbucks Pod as you enter. 

The library doesn’t have to be the stereotypical head-down stress zone that it’s reputable for. 

Established back in 1796, the Andersonian Library has been housed in the Curran Building for more than four decades. It’s in the perfect spot for all students alike – a short walk from student accommodation, and directly opposite is Strathclyde Sport (if you fancy a swim, run on the treadmill or a game of squash to escape from the confines of studying).

The labyrinthian library

Within the library, there’s not a silence only policy but instead a spectrum of noise compliance depending on what floor you end up studying on. 

Levels one and two are open discussion floors, so perfect for group assignments and debates. Flava Cafe on the first floor is a particular hotspot among Strath students for its delicious, freshly made Neapolitan pizza.

A taste of Italy while you study

Floor three is known as the “Quiet Zone”, so great for a less noisy (but not totally noiseless) study environment. While floors four and five are the place to be if you want to completely focus on last minute essay writing, as silence is golden in these areas.

One of the quiet study desks

If you’re needing some time to yourself, or need your own designated space for group work, there are several rooms throughout the library which can be booked for up to two hours via the Strathclyde App and website.

Bookable study rooms – debate to your heart’s content!

If you’re needing some time to yourself, or need your own designated space for group work, there are several rooms throughout the library which can be booked for up to two hours via the Strathclyde App and website.

Bookable study rooms – debate to your heart’s content!

Opened in 2021 following a refurbishment, the Learning and Teaching Building might be a recent development in Strathclyde Uni history, but it has quickly become the centre of student life. 

Overlooking the uni’s stunning Rottenrow Gardens, the building was designed and constructed with sustainability in mind. 

Those cushioned delights that we all need for an all nighter

From comfy, vibrant chairs to quirky and luxurious study pods, the Learning and Teaching Building is a charming place to visit while enjoying your time at Strathclyde. 

Even if studying isn’t on your agenda, just trying out Street Food Bites on level three alone is worth a visit. There’s a range of international foods to try out, with a cultural richness being visible just by walking past the stall and smelling the variety of aromas. Directly next door is Grab and Go, for all your salad and sandwich based lunch essentials.

Self-service machines in front of Grab & Go and Street Food Bites

Many students choose a bite to eat from here then take their takeaway box to one of the numerous study areas of the building – it’s really a perfect aid to a typical study day. 

There’s also the Speaker’s Corner located on level four. Whenever there’s not a debate or reader-themed event on, it’s the perfect comfy space to get some work done.

Perfect your Downing Street speeches

The Learning and Teaching Building takes some getting used to, as there are several connecting wings which make up the building’s architecture. One of the most handy is the Mary Dunn Wing, accessed via level four of the building. The Mary Dunn Wing includes two floors of numerous spacious study rooms. 

The very spacious Mary Dunn Wing study rooms

If you’re wanting a break from the noisiness of the rest of the building, and the strict silence of the upper library floors, then this area is a great middle ground. 

Warning: So comfy that studying may not end up happening

Surrounding the rooms are a range of group oriented table setups and even more of those cosy chairs, so in addition to the independent study aspect, the wing is perfect for catch ups and group meetings.

The building is also home to the Strath Union with the first floor housing a gift shop for must have Strath merch, as well as The Terrace. It is the perfect spot for inexpensive pints, darts, pool, themed karaoke sessions, cosy movie nights, and some tasty meals. 

The colourful Terrace bar

So really, the Learning and Teaching Building has everything you could want from a productive study session (and the food and drink related breaks that come with studying, of course.)

3. Rottenrow Gardens: Strath’s natural beauty

View of the Royal College Building from the Gardens

Something I’ve noticed and feel constantly bewildered by is the absence of students present at this tranquil, natural beauty of an area. 

The gardens are situated amongst the ruins of Glasgow’s Royal Maternity Hospital, offering a scenic glimpse into the city’s rich Victorian history. 

Ruins of the historic hospital at the Gardens’ entrance

There are some benches (just waiting to be studied on) sat close to Rottenrow Gardens and the Mary Dunn Wing surrounded by various plants, flowers and a mini waterfall. 

Stunning pond and autumn leaves in front of the Mary Dunn Wing

In quite a few months time, during the warmer months, you could even enjoy a study-centric picnic on the grass. 

Bench and mini waterfall across from the Gardens

You could be a lover of the outdoors, a history fanatic or simply an admirer of relaxing spots to finish off your work. Rottenrow Gardens offer endless sublimity.

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