this is an editor written post

In 2019, archaeologists from the University of Bristol conducted excavations in the Mendip Hills,


In 2019, archaeologists from the University of Bristol conducted excavations in the Mendip Hills, revealing a previously
unknown Roman settlement dating back to the 1st century AD. This discovery sparked a renewed interest in the region’s
historical significance. As researchers delved deeper into the site, they began to notice striking parallels between the
Mendip Hills and Pompeii.

One of the most remarkable connections is the presence of identical pottery styles found at both sites. The excavation
team unearthed fragments of Roman ceramics, such as amphorae and beakers, which bear an uncanny resemblance to those
discovered in Pompeii’s ruins. This similarity suggests a direct link between the two regions, hinting that there may have
been trade or cultural exchange between the Mendip Hills and the ancient city.

Further investigation revealed that both the Mendip Hills and Pompeii were part of the Roman Empire during the same
period. This shared history led researchers to ponder whether there might be other connections waiting to be uncovered. A
closer examination of the geological makeup of the two regions revealed an unexpected similarity: both are composed
primarily of volcanic rock, with deposits of pyroclastic flow (a type of volcanic debris) present in each location.

This geological connection is not coincidental. The eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD destroyed Pompeii and buried it
under layers of volcanic ash. Similarly, the Mendip Hills have been shaped by the same geological forces, with ancient
volcanoes having played a significant role in their formation.

The discovery of this connection has sparked a new wave of interest in both the Mendip Hills and Pompeii. As researchers
continue to explore these parallels, they are uncovering a wealth of information about the cultural and historical
exchange between the two regions during Roman times. This groundbreaking research is rewriting the history books, shedding
new light on the connections between seemingly disparate locations.